• Rār Farmer

RUiNs

It's not every day that one finds themselves in the car, headed down the highway towards the dark unknown with a Psychoanalyst and a Therapist as their passengers. I did recently, and if you know me, you know I think this has synchronicity written all over it.



Therapist Dani Spano and Psychoanalyst Eric Hinojosa

As some of you may have read from my last post, my friends and I went out to some old abandon warehouses to take pictures, scout around, and most importantly, think, absorb, listen.


While we were there, I kept thinking about Myanmar and the destruction there; I kept thinking about Chernobyl and other places that we continue to ignore. I also couldn't stop thinking about how in my own city, the increasing population of homelessness is hidden away, segregated into a more impoverished, less populated area. Out of sight and out of mind to the greater populace.


This place, with its dark hidden chambers, reminded me of my own mind too. Of the things, I've hidden away there. I wanted to ask D. and E. what they thought about the places in our world that we try to forget about or try to protect from ourselves and those same shadowy places within our minds.



"What do think about the correlation between the places in our world that we intentionally try to forget about or try to hide from ourselves, from our culture, from society, and our ability to compartmentalize internally as individuals? Do you think the forgotten, bulldozed places are manifestations of our inner makeup?"


Eric: If by makeup, you mean our need to destroy and start over, yes. We all have the desire for getting rid of the familiar and wanting something new. We are never complete, we all work from a void that we have in us to perfect our surroundings. Some parts of our past, these kinds of ruins, they resist repression. We are attached people, whether or not we admit it or not. This building almost reminds of the attached parts of our lives that seem hard to shake off.


In the middle of the chaos.

Dani: Those buildings are an excellent metaphor for the things or events in our lives that we want to forget. For years all of the building stood crumbling away with a faded sign broadcasting who to contact if you wanted to purchase everything. There was so much history embedded in it that I hoped someone would take it off their hands, and perhaps, restore and preserve it as a historical landmark.

They're just now starting to tear the buildings down, and it's pretty sad. It's like it was too painful to get rid of for a long time, but also too raw to deal with until the only solution was to try and tear everything out by the roots. But we saw in the piles of bricks and the rebar sticking out of the mangled remains of the basement that it's not that simple. Just like the painful things we try to push deep down in the back of our minds, you have to dig deep and make a mess before you can start to put it in order.


D. Spano

Dani: They're just now starting to tear the buildings down, and it's pretty sad. It's like it was too painful to get rid of for a long time, but also too raw to deal with until the only solution was to try and tear everything out by the roots. But we saw in the piles of bricks and the rebar sticking out of the mangled remains of the basement that it's not that simple. Just like the painful things we try to push deep down in the back of our minds, you have to dig deep and make a mess to start to put it in order.

Dani: It doesn't mean you have to throw everything out though. The people that created the street art all over the wall make something fascinating that others considered useless. When you work on repairing something that is broken you have the opportunity to create something even more beautiful and stronger. It's like kintsugi, a Japanese form of art where they make something stronger and more beautiful for going through that process.





...........to be continued.


#photography #urbanlandscapes #graffiti #art #thought #trauma #psychoanalyst #therapist

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© 2019 Rar Farmer

Rar Photography is a lifestyle, newborn, portrait photographer + content creator based in Fort Worth, TX. Rar serves Dallas Fort Worth and its surrounding areas and specializes in heirloom quality prints for families as well as custom photography for businesses and brands.

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